Conference Presentations

  • [DOI] Coffey, Emily B. J., Emilia M. G. Colagrosso, Alexandre Lehmann, Marc Schönwiesner, and Robert J. Zatorre. 2016. Individual Differences in the Frequency-Following Response: Relation to Pitch Perception. Plos one 11 (3):e0152374.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{Coffey2016,
    author = {Coffey, Emily B. J. and Colagrosso, Emilia M. G. and Lehmann, Alexandre and Sch{\"{o}}nwiesner, Marc and Zatorre, Robert J.},
    doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0152374},
    editor = {Dick, Frederic},
    file = {:home/ecoffey/.local/share/data/Mendeley Ltd./Mendeley Desktop/Downloaded/Coffey et al. - 2016 - Individual Differences in the Frequency-Following Response Relation to Pitch Perception.pdf:pdf},
    issn = {1932-6203},
    journal = {PLOS ONE},
    month = {mar},
    number = {3},
    pages = {e0152374},
    publisher = {Public Library of Science},
    title = {{Individual Differences in the Frequency-Following Response: Relation to Pitch Perception}},
    url = {http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371{\%}2Fjournal.pone.0152374},
    volume = {11},
    year = {2016}
    }
  • [DOI] Coffey, Emily B. J., Sibylle C. Herholz, Alexander M. P. Chepesiuk, Sylvain Baillet, and Robert J. Zatorre. 2016. Cortical contributions to the auditory frequency-following response revealed by MEG. Nature communications 7 11070.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{Coffey2016a,
    author = {Coffey, Emily B. J. and Herholz, Sibylle C. and Chepesiuk, Alexander M. P. and Baillet, Sylvain and Zatorre, Robert J.},
    doi = {10.1038/ncomms11070},
    file = {:home/ecoffey/Documents/Mendeley Desktop/Coffey/ncomms11070.pdf:pdf;:home/ecoffey/Documents/Mendeley Desktop/Coffey/ncomms11070-s1.pdf:pdf},
    issn = {2041-1723},
    journal = {Nature Communications},
    language = {en},
    month = {mar},
    pages = {11070},
    publisher = {Nature Publishing Group},
    title = {{Cortical contributions to the auditory frequency-following response revealed by MEG}},
    url = {http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2016/160324/ncomms11070/full/ncomms11070.html},
    volume = {7},
    year = {2016}
    }
  • Raijmakers, M. E. J., E. Coffey, C. Stevenson, J. Winkel, and A. Berkeljon. 2009. An ART neural network model of discrimination shift learning. 791–798.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{Raijmakers2009,
    author = {Raijmakers, M.E.J. and Coffey, E. and Stevenson, C. and Winkel, J. and Berkeljon, A.},
    file = {:home/ecoffey/.local/share/data/Mendeley Ltd./Mendeley Desktop/Downloaded/Raijmakers et al. - 2009 - An ART neural network model of discrimination shift learning.pdf:pdf},
    isbn = {9780976831853},
    pages = {791--798},
    title = {{An ART neural network model of discrimination shift learning}},
    url = {http://dare.uva.nl/record/1/313088},
    year = {2009}
    }
  • [DOI] Goltstein, Pieter M., Emily B. J. Coffey, Pieter R. Roelfsema, and Cyriel M. A. Pennartz. 2013. In vivo two-photon Ca2+ imaging reveals selective reward effects on stimulus-specific assemblies in mouse visual cortex.. The journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the society for neuroscience 33 (28):11540–55.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{Goltstein2013,
    abstract = {Experiences can alter functional properties of neurons in primary sensory neocortex but it is poorly understood how stimulus-reward associations contribute to these changes. Using in vivo two-photon calcium imaging in mouse primary visual cortex (V1), we show that association of a directional visual stimulus with reward results in broadened orientation tuning and sharpened direction tuning in a stimulus-selective subpopulation of V1 neurons. Neurons with preferred orientations similar, but not identical to, the CS+ selectively increased their tuning curve bandwidth and thereby exhibited an increased response amplitude at the CS+ orientation. The increase in response amplitude was observed for a small range of orientations around the CS+ orientation. A nonuniform spatial distribution of reward effects across the cortical surface was observed, as the spatial distance between pairs of CS+ tuned neurons was reduced compared with pairs of CS- tuned neurons and pairs of control directions or orientations. These data show that, in primary visual cortex, formation of a stimulus-reward association results in selective alterations in stimulus-specific assemblies rather than population-wide effects.},
    author = {Goltstein, Pieter M and Coffey, Emily B J and Roelfsema, Pieter R and Pennartz, Cyriel M A},
    doi = {10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1341-12.2013},
    file = {:home/ecoffey/Documents/Mendeley Desktop/Goltstien/11540.full.pdf:pdf},
    issn = {1529-2401},
    journal = {The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience},
    keywords = {Animals,Calcium,Calcium: metabolism,Conditioning, Operant,Conditioning, Operant: physiology,Confocal,Confocal: methods,Fluorescence,Inbred C57BL,Male,Mice,Mice, Inbred C57BL,Microscopy, Confocal,Microscopy, Confocal: methods,Microscopy, Fluorescence, Multiphoton,Microscopy, Fluorescence, Multiphoton: methods,Multiphoton,Multiphoton: methods,Operant,Operant: physiology,Photic Stimulation,Photic Stimulation: methods,Random Allocation,Reward,Visual Cortex,Visual Cortex: chemistry,Visual Cortex: metabolism,Visual Fields,Visual Fields: physiology},
    month = {jul},
    number = {28},
    pages = {11540--55},
    pmid = {23843524},
    title = {{In vivo two-photon Ca2+ imaging reveals selective reward effects on stimulus-specific assemblies in mouse visual cortex.}},
    url = {http://www.jneurosci.org/content/33/28/11540.abstract},
    volume = {33},
    year = {2013}
    }
  • Coffey, E. B. J., E. M. G. Colagrosso, A. Lehmann, M. Schönwiesner, and R. J. Zatorre. 2016. Individual differences in the frequency-following response: Relation to pitch perception. Plos one [in review .
    [Bibtex]
    @article{Coffey2016b,
    author = {Coffey, E.B.J. and Colagrosso, E.M.G and Lehmann, A. and Sch{\"{o}}nwiesner, M. and Zatorre, R.J.},
    journal = {PloS one},
    title = {{Individual differences in the frequency-following response: Relation to pitch perception}},
    volume = {[in review},
    year = {2016}
    }
  • [DOI] Coffey, E. B. J. and S. C. Herholz. 2013. Task decomposition: A framework for comparing diverse training models in human brain plasticity studies. Frontiers in human neuroscience (OCT):.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{Coffey2013,
    abstract = {Training studies, in which the structural or functional neurophysiology is compared before and after expertise is acquired, are increasingly being used as models for understanding the human brain's potential for reorganization. It is proving difficult to use these results to answer basic and important questions like how task training leads to both specific and general changes in behavior and how these changes correspond with modifications in the brain. The main culprit is the diversity of paradigms used as complex task models. An assortment of activities ranging from juggling to deciphering Morse code has been reported. Even when working in the same general domain, few researchers use similar training models. New ways to meaningfully compare complex tasks are needed. We propose a method for characterizing and deconstructing the task requirements of complex training paradigms, which is suitable for application to both structural and functional neuroimaging studies. We believe this approach will aid brain plasticity research by making it easier to compare training paradigms, identify missing puzzle pieces, and encourage researchers to design training protocols to bridge these gaps. © 2013 Coffey and Herholz.},
    author = {Coffey, E.B.J. and Herholz, S.C.},
    doi = {10.3389/fnhum.2013.00640},
    issn = {16625161},
    journal = {Frontiers in Human Neuroscience},
    keywords = {Expertise,MRI,Multisensory learning,Plasticity,Training},
    number = {OCT},
    title = {{Task decomposition: A framework for comparing diverse training models in human brain plasticity studies}},
    year = {2013}
    }
  • [DOI] Coffey, E. B. J., A. -M. Brouwer, E. S. Wilschut, and J. B. F. van Erp. 2010. Brain-machine interfaces in space: Using spontaneous rather than intentionally generated brain signals. Acta astronautica 67 (1-2):1–11.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{Coffey2010,
    abstract = {Recent advances in non-invasive brain-machine or brain-computer interfaces (BMIs/BCIs) have demonstrated that humans can control computers or simple robotic devices using only brain signals. These successes have lead to the suggestion that BMIs could significantly improve the safety and efficiency of space operations. Electroencephalography (EEG) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-based BMIs are most relevant for potential space applications due to their portability, non-invasiveness, and relative inexpensiveness. However, BMIs using these methods are limited in their speed, content, and accuracy of information transfer. In this paper, we suggest that the performance limitations of current BMIs may reflect the incomplete information of non-invasive signals rather than merely a lack of maturity of the technology. As an alternative to using BMIs for direct control, we describe how new research on monitoring spontaneously generated brain signals may be practically applied in space operations. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
    author = {Coffey, E.B.J. and Brouwer, A.-M. and Wilschut, E.S. and van Erp, J.B.F.},
    doi = {10.1016/j.actaastro.2009.12.016},
    issn = {00945765},
    journal = {Acta Astronautica},
    keywords = {Astronaut,Brain-computer interface,Brain-machine interface,Electroencephalography,NIRS},
    number = {1-2},
    pages = {1--11},
    title = {{Brain-machine interfaces in space: Using spontaneous rather than intentionally generated brain signals}},
    volume = {67},
    year = {2010}
    }
  • Hochstein, J., A. Rasheed, J. Stone, E. Coffey, A. Martin, F. Qiang, I. Christensen, and C. B. {Del Pino}. 2008. Improved earthquake response via simulation and integrated space-and groundbased technologies: The TREMOR proposal. Paper read at International astronautical federation – 59th international astronautical congress 2008, iac 2008.
    [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{Hochstein2008,
    abstract = {Earthquakes occurring around the world each year cause thousands of deaths, millions of dollars in damage to infrastructure, and incalculable human suffering. In recent years, satellite technology has been a significant boon to response efforts following an earthquake and its after-effects by providing mobile communications between response teams and remote sensing of damaged areas to disaster management organizations. In 2007, an international team of students and professionals assembled during the International Space University's Summer Session Program in Beijing, China to examine how satellite and ground-based technology could be better integrated to provide an optimised response in the event of an earthquake. The resulting Technology Resources for Earthquake MOnitoring and Response (TREMOR) proposal describes an integrative prototype response system that will implement mobile satellite communication hubs providing telephone and data links between response teams, onsite telemedicine consultation for emergency first-responders, and satellite navigation systems that will locate and track emergency vehicles and guide search-and-rescue crews. A prototype earthquake simulation system is also proposed, integrating historical data, earthquake precursor data, and local geomatics and infrastructure information to predict the damage that could occur in the event of an earthquake. The backbone of these proposals is a comprehensive education and training program to help individuals, communities and governments prepare in advance. The TREMOR team recommends the coordination of these efforts through a centralised, non-governmental organization.},
    author = {Hochstein, J. and Rasheed, A. and Stone, J. and Coffey, E. and Martin, A. and Qiang, F. and Christensen, I. and {Del Pino}, C.B.},
    booktitle = {International Astronautical Federation - 59th International Astronautical Congress 2008, IAC 2008},
    isbn = {9781615671601},
    pages = {7826--7839},
    title = {{Improved earthquake response via simulation and integrated space-and groundbased technologies: The TREMOR proposal}},
    volume = {12},
    year = {2008}
    }
  • [DOI] Coffey, E. B. J., A. -M. Brouwer, and J. B. F. {Van Erp}. 2012. Measuring workload using a combination of electroencephalography and near infrared spectroscopy. Paper read at Proceedings of the human factors and ergonomics society.
    [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{Coffey2012,
    abstract = {The ability to continuously monitor workload in a real-world environment would have important implications for the offline design of human machine interfaces as well as the real-time improvement of interaction between humans and machines. We explored the usefulness of features derived from electroencephalography (EEG) spectra, near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) hemoglobin concentration, and their combination, under data acquisition and processing conditions that could be applied to real-time usage. We simultaneously recorded from eight EEG and three NIRS channels during different workload conditions of the N-back task (N = 0, 1, 2). EEG and NIRS data were classified independently, and in combination. EEG could be used to reliably classify workload condition for most subjects and NIRS for half of them. NIRS tended to contribute to classification accuracy when combined with EEG in some subjects. We discuss implications and future directions. Copyright 2012 by Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, Inc. All rights reserved.},
    author = {Coffey, E.B.J. and Brouwer, A.-M. and {Van Erp}, J.B.F.},
    booktitle = {Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society},
    doi = {10.1177/1071181312561367},
    isbn = {9780945289418},
    issn = {10711813},
    pages = {1822--1826},
    title = {{Measuring workload using a combination of electroencephalography and near infrared spectroscopy}},
    year = {2012}
    }
  • Scala;, Coffey; Herholz; Zatorre E. B. J. S. C. S. R. J.. Montreal Music History Questionnaire: a tool for the assessment of music-related experience. Paper read at The neurosciences and music iv: learning and memory conferenceat Edinburgh, UK.
    [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{Scala;,
    address = {Edinburgh, UK},
    author = {Scala;, E.B.J. Coffey; S.C. Herholz; S. R.J. Zatorre},
    booktitle = {The Neurosciences and Music IV: Learning and Memory conference},
    title = {{Montreal Music History Questionnaire: a tool for the assessment of music-related experience}}
    }